Milk without cows, eggs without chickens

09/03/2018 | www.wnd.com

Chicken Egg without Eggshell 5859.jpg
By Biswarup Ganguly, CC BY 3.0, Link
Tucked away inconspicuously in an old “bio-hacker” space in Oakland, California, are the research facilities of Counter Culture Labs founded by biologist Ryan Bethencourt.

He may have the answer to the old question of which came first, the chicken or the egg.

One of his goals is to produce eggs without chickens. Another is to produce milk without cows.

It may sound crazy, but the future may be right around the corner.

Bethencourt is just one of a growing group of scientist-entrepreneurs determined to produce artificial animal-like food without the animals.

…But how does it taste?

Is it as good as the real thing?

Is it healthy?

What would God think about it? …

To that, says Isha Datar, executive director of New Harvest: “Today, milk is made by artificially inseminating a cow at 13 months of age, having it bear a calf nine months later, having the calf removed (to be made into veal), and then maintaining the cow in a lactating state for about two years. By age 4, the dairy cow is culled for beef.” Read more.


The good old days

Twins from Llandderfel who milk their cow everyday to get milk for their cats (4478887730).jpg
By Geoff Charles - Twins from Llandderfel who milk their cow everyday to get milk for their cats, CC0, Link

Pray for our troops

Military now faced with watching for enemy bacteria

WND.com | Joseph Farah | Feb 17 2018

bacteria Credit: Chris Mason. CC BY The U.S. government is working on how to identity, contain and defeat an enemy that is becoming more and more dangerous: bacteria…

The issue, especially for the U.S. military, is to discriminate between harmless and virulent strains.

The new program proposes to develop a technology that “rapidly screens unfamiliar bacteria to establish their pathogenicity and even discover unknown pathogenic traits, necessary first steps for designing effective biosurveillance and countermeasures.”

Paul Sheehan, the program manager for the project, stepped in to comment.

“Trends such as rising global population, changes in the environment, and the growing accessibility of tools for genetic engineering mean that our armed forces are increasingly likely to face new bacterial pathogens, whether they occur naturally or are engineered by adversaries,” he said.

“Our existing biosurveillance strategies don’t work on previously undiscovered bacteria or on bacteria that have been specifically designed to evade detection by current tests. We need new screening tools that can quickly characterize the threat to enable a rapid response.” Read more

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...and every living creature that moveth, which the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind ... the living creature after his kind, cattle, and creeping thing, and beast of the earth after his kind ...the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind: and God saw that it was good. -Genesis 1

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A SistersSite eBook

Flesh and Bone and The Protestant Conscience is an e-book on Amazon.com. It is 99¢ and in the Amazon lending library as well. The book description follows.

Would you let your conscience be your guide?

Does God care if the skin and bone of the dead are passed along to the living for medical uses? Is organ donation OK with God? Should you sign a Living Will?

Did you know that dead organ donors are often anesthetized before their organs are removed? Do you know the current definition of death? The conscience cannot function without facts.

As we ponder the ethics of in vitro fertilization, stem cell research and man-made chimeras, our thoughts trail off. How then should we live? (Ez 33:10)

How should a Christian think about euthanasia by starvation when doctors and the state attorney general all agree it is time to withhold feeding from a brain injured patient? Some things are family matters, but someday it may be our family.

Here is a small book to help you think about whether you want to sign your driver's license, donate a kidney, cremate your loved one, and many other practical questions that may arise in the course of your healthcare decisions or watch over others.

It offers a special focus on the doctrine of the Resurrection that is related to such decisions. Sunday School classes and Bible Study groups could use this book to facilitate discussion about the issues covered.